An Interview with David Hayes from darren elliott on Vimeo.

In February of this year I was fortunate enough to visit Kathmandu for the NELTA conference. As an outsider and an observer I felt the conference itself had a very interesting dynamic. It seemed to me that as the local organisers and the foreign developmental agencies seemed to respectfully dance around each other, trying to balance financial support, advice and autonomy. In that kind of situation it can be awkward for a foreign presenter to be parachuted in – feted as an ‘expert’ yet with little understanding of the local context. Overall, I think the outside agencies try their very hardest to offer support without overpowering the recipients of that support, but I don’t know …. I’d be interested to read your comments on the topic below, or even in a private message if it’s too delicate to discuss.

However, in David Hayes, I think the organisers identified someone who could offer insights to his audience. David has worked all over the world and been involved in teacher development projects in many different contexts. We talk about some of them here, as well as teacher training and development in general.

The next NELTA conference will take place in March 2016. Sadly, there are still many people who need support after the devastating earthquake of 2015. At the time of the earthquake there were a number of Nepali-led local groups who were very active. As the relief efforts have become less urgent some of these have wound down, but if you would like to support the reconstruction there is still a lot to be done. For long term benefits, Room to Read has a strong programme in Nepal. If you know of any other small but effective charities, please comment below.

An Interview with Melinda Dooly and Shannon Sauro from darren elliott on Vimeo.

I interviewed Melinda Dooly and Shannon Sauro at EUROCALL 2015 in Padova, Italy. They talk here about their experience working on international educational research projects, particularly in telecollaboration, and managing the practical, legal and ethical requirements of such projects. Potentially very problematic, but also very important.

Just to let you ‘behind the curtain’ at Lives of Teachers HQ, I approached this interview in a slightly different fashion from the others on the site. Usually I attend a conference with one or two interviews in mind, and I often contact potential interviewees in advance and read some of their work beforehand. I wasn’t aware of Shannon or Melinda before I saw their presentation, but I was so impressed I asked them if they would spare a little time to talk, and this is what you see here. I had a great experience at the conference, partly because it was in a beautiful place, and partly because it was packed with very clever people explaining interesting things well.

If you enjoy this interview, please check out more in the archives. You can subscribe to the podcast version on iTunes, and follow on email, twitter or Facebook for updates – check out the sidebar for the links.